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Kayleigh McMullen

Screen Shot 2015-08-11 at 8.53.55 amHOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
I have a dance background and grew up on the Sunshine Coast. I actually had my 13th birthday party at Cirque Espace on the flying trapeze! Then I was hooked and wanted to learn more and more!

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
I also ride horses when I have the time and am studying my Masters in Speech Pathology.

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU? EVERYTHING!
I absolutely cannot imagine life without movement. It’s my ‘me’ time, my social time and where I feel I can achieve anything if I work hard enough.

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WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
Ohh this one is tough! I’ve got to perform at many beautiful events but my experience working with an Australian circus as part of their flying trapeze troupe was a fantastic experience. I’ve also just opened my own studio on the Sunshine Coast this year (Absolute Aerials) and am loving sharing my skills with other likeminded people and watching them grow.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING AND WHY?
I’ve always loved dance and aerial silks. For me they go really well together and I’m able to use my strength to my advantage a bit more. I love the drops, twists, turns and dancing to the music. It’s my happy place. Nothing beats the appreciation an audience can give you!

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
I would like to at some stage be part of a production performing aerials/dance or flying trapeze. Whether that’s in Australia or overseas I don’t know. But something, I’m certainly not done performing and am super excited for what the next few years might bring. I’d like my business to have expanded by training some more coaches and perhaps even be using my degree in Speech Pathology to run special classes or sessions that incorporate both my passions.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
Because it makes people happy and provides the most inspiring and captivating spaces!

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Ann Truong

At the Melbourne Fringe Festival, ACAPTA sponsors an award acknowledging the talents of emerging artists. We are proud to announce the 2015 winner of our Best Emerging Circus Performer,  Ann Truong for her work in ‘No Punchline’!

 
HOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?Ann_headshot_1
I took my brother out for his birthday one year to see Seven Fingers when they were in town. The opening scene was a performer running out onto stage and spiral climbing up the pole without his legs, accompanied by this deep percussion beat. It was very visceral and inspiring. When we were walking out of the show, my brother said “Wow, I’ve got to go see more of these shows” and I said “Wow, I’ve got to do that”.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
I’m an actor and voice actor.

 
WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
NP water 2Working on ‘No Punchline’ and winning this award! The last circus specific show I did was Sara Pheasant’s ‘Leggings are Not Pants’.  It’s been 3 years since Leggings and during that time I’ve grown a lot as an actor. I was really excited to have the opportunity to bring what I do as an actor into my circus work. Prior, I think I perceived acting and circus to be distinctly different and that circus was more about ‘performing tricks’. I’ve come to learn that it’s all one in the same – screen acting, stage acting, circus, writing, directing – that it’s about connection, honesty, vulnerability and openness. So, again, I was very excited to have the opportunity to bring my honesty and heart to this show.

 
WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
No specifics – to continue working and growing.  If I could move forward as a performer in the next 5 years as much as I have in the last 5 years, I’ll be very happy. I’d also like to write/direct/produce. I have an epic physical theatre project of mine that will take a few years to complete. So in 5 years time, I hope to have seen it actualise.

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Photography credits:  Owen Spear and Nick Abregu
Vincent Van Berkel

Vincent Van Berkel

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HOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
I followed a girl. Then I followed my nose! And now I follow my gut.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
Photographer, blogger.

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
It’s the first thing that I truly and wholeheartedly believe in. I found and lost many interests in life before I found circus, and this is the one thing in which I believe in both the art and the industry.

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
Touring Arnhem Land with Circus Oz, performing in the oldest theatre in Stockholm called Sodra Teatern with Casus, and entertaining 5000 people including the Crown Prince of Brunei, in Brunei.

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IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
Taking photos of, videoing and writing about of people doing circus and physical theatre.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING AND WHY?
Teeterboard, because it’s a rarity these days. I love being high in the air. I also like dreaming up and performing usual acrobatics and hand-balancing on unusual props. I’m getting more into movement-dance (I use the term quite loosely) so that’s a current fascination of mine.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
I’d like to be performing, creating work and being part of an amazing company, mine or someone else’s. I’ll do it until my body packs it in, then stay in the industry until I’m way past the salt-and-pepper grey I am at the moment.

 

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
There are things that can’t be expressed, explored or explained with words. I’m realising, as I discover it myself, that people need to participate (or at least be a viewer of) artistic physicality as a part of everyday life. It’s not like we don’t know that; people have danced around fires or dance floors throughout time. But it must be propagated, nourished and validated. Many physical artforms are being blended, hybridised, cross-pollinated and are evolving through sharing of ideas and skills. This is a wonderful thing, and speaks of the strength of the artform of circus and physical theatre being at the centre of this movement. Circus is the true melting pot of myriad skills, the central pillar to which creative ingredients are added to enrich, not dilute. Circus is the base, and all other things are the toppings!

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You can follow Vince and his writing on circus at www.onemetricvincent.wordpress.com

Pride March 2015

POW (Performing Older Women’s) Circus

HOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?Pride March 2015
In 1995 Jean Taylor, a then member of Women’s Circus, ran a series of workshops in circus skills for women aged 40+ culminating in a performance – Act Your Age. After the show the members decided to form an autonomous group, Performing Older Women’s Circus auspiced initially by Footscray Community Arts Centre (FCAC) and by Auspicious Arts from 2006 onwards.

POW Circus was lucky enough to have Kim Baston become the Artistic Director (& Music Director) in 2000 and went from strength to strength under her direction. Annual shows ran for 2 weeks in venues such as North Melbourne Town Hall, rural tours were undertaken and many smaller performances around Melbourne. There were up to 35 members training weekly in music, aerials, and acrobalance and intensives in stilts, African drumming, German wheel, juggling, Bouffon and clowning.

Many women who join POW have had no prior experience in circus, physical theatre or related arts. There is no audition and we will always find something they can do.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
Some members are retired from paid work, others in the workforce, parenting children, some have illness to deal with, whilst others have moved on to careers in circus, theatre or the arts. We have members that travel from the country to attend class or gigs.

We are always looking at ways to encourage new members and have hosted Meetup events, introduced: casual attendance; associate membership for under 40’s; and a free first class.

Acrobalance training is it at the moment but we still do small gigs especially around Senior’s Week. We have stilt walked/ marched in Gay Pride March every year since the beginning; in fact I think we both began in the same year.

Next month we will be performing at Collingwood Town Hall on stilts and German wheel as part of the Celebration of Life multicultural event.

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WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
POW Circus is like a group of friends or family and the bond is still there even if we don’t see each other for some time.

POW’s objectives are:

  • to challenge ageism and ageist assumptions
  • to promote wellbeing and fitness for women over 40 of any sexual orientation, ethnicity, class, experience and physical ability
  • to advance the status of women by embracing feminist perspectives and fostering lesbian visibility
  • to have fun and work safely

Circus is our way to increase lesbian and older women’s visibility in the performing arts.

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
Performing in the 2002 Sydney Gay Games Cultural Festival at Paddington Town Hall the show -The Maiden Aunt’s Story. The show dealt with loss and resilience in humorous and physically daring ways that inspired audiences to reflect on family, companionship and being alone. Closely followed by our 2012 flash mob circus performance as part of Nilumbik Council Bushfire Recovery project.

IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
Some sort of exercise and performing and generally not acting our age!

We have continued training and performing since 2006 without funding or a director! Our acrobalance trainer is Dorota Scally who is now old enough to join POW herself.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING?IMG_0358
Acrobalance, adagio, German wheel, stilts, music, impro. I think it is great that we have many performers now over 60 and still rocking a pair of stilts or basing an acrobalance.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
Still training and performing as part of POW Circus and with a steady skill base to draw from for gigs. We want new members who want to stay the distance as well as having fun in an intimate, welcoming community circus.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
It’s fun, challenging and entertaining. For older women (and men) it is a great way to retain and improve strength and flexibility in a non threatening, non competitive environment.

Find out more about POW, email powcircus@yahoo.com.au. (POW offers your first class for free!)

Pixi Roberton

Pixi Roberton

Pixi RobertonHOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
Classic circus thru’ dance and working in a Risley Act with Alfie Warren, a member of the Ashton circus dynasty.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
Now I’ve retired from active performing and teaching, I write novels for young adults (suitable for grown ups, too) and in my role as Oceania Co-ordinator for World Circus Day I aim to increase the public’s awareness of circus as a vital, ever-changing and growing art-form in its many modern manifestations.

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
I love all forms of live performance, particularly when it is married to live music, so I also push this barrow. I also like film (and tv sometimes) and in fact wrote, produced and co-directed a short-listed short film for Newcastle’s Shoot Out comp in 2008, a process I enjoyed very much. That same year I wrote, produced and directed an instructional DVD called Hula Hips©.

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
Well, I think I started at the top – flying trapeze (Der Fliegenden Diamonds) on one of Europe’s biggest circuses, Zirkus Bush-Roland which, at that time, had a 4,000-seater 4-pole canvas tent. Being a founding member of Circus Oz was a milestone, and I’m extremely proud to have been the Associate Artistic Director, along with my husband Jim Robertson, and teacher, of the inaugural Flying Fruit Fly Circus. Tanya Lester performing my Spanish Web routine at the Cirque de Demain in Paris, and winning a special bursary prize, was pretty damn exciting, too.

IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?product_thumbnail.php
Writing. Available now on lulu.com BUNTY ARMITAGE CIRCUS GIRL; TEMPO a Circus Romance; and coming soon, DEATH and the ACCIDENTAL DETECTIVE.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING?
I will always have a soft spot in my heart for risley and foot-juggling, but love flying trapeze and performing with any kind of horse act. Elephant riding is also something I enjoyed very much.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
I’m self-publishing at the moment with lulu.com but in 5 years time, before I’m absolutely ancient, I would love to have a legit publishing contract.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
To quote a female photographer whose name escapes me entirely, “Circus, celebrating the sheer joy of doing something perfectly useless perfectly” [Editor's note: earliest reference we could find for this quote was Jill Freedman]. Also the Fédération Mondiale du Cirque, the parent body for World Circus Day, is about “… promoting the art of happiness.” I think both these statements just about sum up my feelings. Without happiness and the ability to just enjoy life, well ….

 

Rockie Stone Website size acapta

Rockie Stone

Rockie Stone Website size acaptaHOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
I danced my whole childhood, since the age of 3. At 18 I decided to get a science degree and play basketball instead. Struggling to push 5 foot, basketball wasn’t a natural choice, so when an older friend took me to see POW (Performing Older Women) Circus, my cells danced and I became like a two year old in a candy shop “gimme gimme gimme”! But one had to be 40 to join POW!? I quickly discovered there was a whole wide world of circus out there and I feasted on it, spending every penny I had on classes. Before too long I had been accepted into the very first intake of NICA, then cast in Rock N Roll Circus, now C!RCA.

 

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
Make Live Art, Self-Produce, garden, and renovate buildings.

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
It’s the medium for my art. It’s my practice. It’s my craft and the mode for my expression. It’s an incredibly diverse and inclusive artform. It’s hard to define. It’s what I deeply love.

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IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
Being a Zoologist. Teaching English in South-East Asia. Working as a Community Development Worker. Being an architect… I have had many other starts in my life so far…

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING?
Hand to Hand, Chair Balancing, Corde Lisse, Cloudswing, and “Applied Tightwire”

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
On a stage

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
Apparently we don’t. But we need art. And we need to move; and be inspired; and be challenged; and see life upside-down at times; and be scared sometimes; and work closely with others; and do things that make people laugh, cry or gasp. So apparently we do need circus. Circus is my craft and my art. I definitely need circus.

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR? 
Last year, as part of ACAPTA’s Australia Council Cultural Leadership Skills Development Project, I travelled to Belgium and The Netherlands to research the circus industry – Social Circus, Circus in schools, professional Circus Schools, Training spaces, small companies, new circus works, Venues and programmers, circus festivals, and opportunities for circus artists – in that part of the world. I was also privileged to attend the European CircoStrada meeting in Kortrijk, Belgium.

Rockie Stone

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Rockie Stone is a physical performer and contemporary theatre maker with a drive to create art with bodies. She has a versatility enabling her to create work in a variety of forms and settings. Rockie has been performing professionally since 2001 across the globe with various ensembles including Circa and Circus Oz, and a maker of independent work since 2005.

Rockie is co-founder of contemporary circus theatre company 3 is a Crowd, Artistic Associate at Westside Circus, one half of acrobatic duo ConcentricCircus, a fifth of jazz/circus ensemble in.form, and a director of circus & physical theatre. She was recently appointed to the ACAPTA Board as a general member for 2015.


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Felicia [Flick] Lannan

Illuminate _sm_BJB1214HOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
My mum is a costume designer and part of her course had her designing and making costumes for the Flying Fruit Fly Circus’ end of year production. I’d been doing gymnastics for a few years and she brought me along one day. While she worked I played on all the fun equipment and was asked to audition immediately! I started school and training there in the following year.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
You mean other than train, run Madhouse Circus and perform? I didn’t know there was time to do anything else!

Actually, I do like to write. I have a blog which I update with small articles on Circus Life and Twenty-Something Life. It’s where I put the stuff that I haven’t figured out how to put on stage. You can view it here: www.clickforflick.wordpress.com

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
As lame and mushy as it is… It’s a community. It’s a support network of friends and colleagues whose opportunities are vast and will always be an integral part of my life, were I to quit tomorrow or in 10 year, it wouldn’t matter.

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WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
I feel like I should say working with Firenza Guidi (No Fit State) in my final year of NICA because it was such an honour and learning experience. Or going overseas with my classmates and seeing all the fabulous work going on in Europe. If I’m honest though, it’s Madhouse Circus. I’m proud every time we perform, every time train and develop, I’m so happy to have started this company with friends and have such amazing artists that make it a joy to keep on keeping on.

IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
I actually have no idea. I can run some hypotheticals but it feels like my whole life has been linked to circus and physical theatre, I can’t imagine being without it. If I’d pursued gymnastics I’d probably still be a while off going to the Olympics and stuck in a gym somewhere training like there’s no outside world.

If I’d had no inclination to continue sport or arts then I’d like to think I’d be travelling, maybe volunteering with animals in other countries. After my performing career I plan on pursuing directing and other sides of production so my favourite scenario is that I’d be going to NIDA or somewhere similar. Following a different strain of my current path.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING AND WHY?
I love German wheel but I always get really nervous, so it’s up there but it’s not my favourite. I love performing the ridiculous acrobatic/adagio routines that I get to do with my friends on stage. For example, in Madhouse Circus’ Illuminate, Jon Bon and I made an elaborate and acrobatic handshake which we performed as fast as possible, or in Long Answer’s to Simple Question’s LEFT, we play games and get to jump on each other, genuinely having fun, for and with the audience.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
Right now I’m working toward building Madhouse Circus as a company. I’d like to see us developing a new show in the next year and touring it internationally and nationally within the next five. In five years’ time I hope I’ve been to at least one Ed Fringe, one EJC, visited North and South America whether for business or just holidays & I’d love to have been accepted into the one-year directing intensive at NIDA.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
We’re a strange mix of athlete and artist and I don’t think we could constrain ourselves to being just one. We need this art form to express both sides of ourselves and that it brings to joy to audiences is just a bonus!

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Felicia is the founder and director of Madhouse Circus, which formed in 2012 and has toured to Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide.

A graduate of NICA, Felicia specialise in German wheel, Korean plank and hula hoops, as well as having experience in general acrobatics including pitching, tumbling and table sliding. More about Madhouse can be found at www.facebook.com/madhousecircus 

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Nick Davies

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HOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
I danced throughout my teens in Tasmania. After school I left physical theatre and focused on outdoor adventure for a decade, then discovering aerials with Inside Out Circus in Motueka, New Zealand, the circus journey begun! From there on the massive support from NZ circus community especially Wellington Circus Trust and Circus Aotearoa helped make it a reality.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
The rest of my time is spent outdoors, mostly sea kayaking. I work in tertiary Outdoor Education and in Adventure Therapy related group work / social work.

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
It means expression and empowerment; collaboration by some of the outsiders of society to let the others in.

 

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
Circus for me has been a constant journey of learning and being humbled. My highlights are learning big things from small people (children) both from audiences and students.

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IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
Floating on the ocean.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING AND WHY?
I like the personal experience of performing straps and the sense of collective and excitement of group acrobatics.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
I would like to be involved with community development social circus programs, supporting groups of people to achieve their dreams.  Also performing and developing theatrical aspects of performing.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
Because the whole world can fit into circus (if we let it!)

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Nick Davies is the social and school program coordinator at Slipstream Circus in Tasmania.

Slipstream Circus is a non-profit Youth Circus. Circus Skills started in 1997 within Burnie Gymnastics club and SSC was incorporated in Ulverstone in 2000. Slipstream conducts classes in circus skills for all ages and skill levels. They aim to foster personal development as well as cooperation and community involvement. More about Slipstream can be found at www.slipstreamcircus.org.au

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Sam Thomas

934753_303917049782915_3687315851547945519_n-2HOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
My mum is a choreographer/dancer teacher, as a child I operated the music in her classes. That was the start of it for me. I was 9yrs old when I began performing at festivals and community events in the UK, with my Father’s Street Theatre company “The Fabulous Salami Brothers” in my teens I formed my own group “The Chipolatas”..and since 1992 we have performed all over the world.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
Yoga and housework, not necessarily in that order and sometimes simultaneously, together, at the same time,

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
It means listening, adapting, focusing, developing, and creating. It means storytelling. It means rhythm. It means movement. It means performance.

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
Over the last 25 years our work has taken us to extremely diverse locations and situations around the world from the intimacy of orphanages in the Ukraine to the sweltering streets of down-town Sao Paulo in Brazil. Last year I performed in a show together with my 5yr old daughter and my Dad…Three generations of my family sharing the stage together…That was a total highlight!

The Castlemaine Circus project is also huge highlight and has been a success on so many levels. In 12 months we have grown from 47 enrolments over 3 weekly classes to over 100 students participating in 8 weekly classes. We are a non for profit organisation run by a committed core of creatively minded people driving our vision. We have an incredibly talented team of trainers, and support from local families. We are open and receptive to the ever evolving landscape of our community, embracing new opportunities whilst maintaining a viable artistic organisation.

This year the Castlemaine Circus Festival is excited to be presenting the first ever regional SESH, ‘CIRCUS SPRUIK’ with ACAPTA and the Castlemaine State Festival. It’ll be a great day of performances and conversation, taking place during the fabulous Castlemaine Festival, definitely worth the trip down if you can.

IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
Bush camping by the beach with my family.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING AND WHY?
Handstand. Because it requires my whole self.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
We need it because its a celebration of a real human experience in an increasingly virtual world.

10658909_10153363757816686_6371981718298095870_oA true international traveller and performer, Sam Thomas has spent many years touring with The Chipolatas and working as an artistic director and creative producer as well as a performer. Sam Thomas has a proven track record in professional and high quality arts provision, committed to inclusion and equal opportunities. His repertoire includes a wide range of educational projects, prioritising the passing on of skills to new generations.

Sam’s work focuses on traditional street theatre, combining it with contemporary movement, original live music, circus imagery and classic comedy. Sam enjoys creating engaging, inspiring and relevant workshops for a wide audience, adapting to, and entertaining people of different ages and cultures by continually evolving his performance and teaching techniques, consistently devising and developing original work.

CIRCUS SPRUIK will take place in Castlemaine on the 20th March 2015 at 10:30am to 3pm, for more info and bookings see: www.acapta.org.au/whats-on/circus-spruik/

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Lynda Sanderson

IMG_0222-smallHOW DID YOU GET INTO CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE?
I helped rig the Fuse aerial performance set in 2010 in New Zealand, met some performers who were doing aerials full time and fell in love with the idea that I wasn’t too old to start.

WHAT ELSE DO YOU DO?
I am a qualified geologist or I was before I fell in love with circus, now I am a sole trader for my business called Stellar Life.  I am a rigger, aerialist, administrator, safety officer, web developer.. I wear all of the hats.

 

WHAT DOES CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE MEAN TO YOU?
It means telling my story.  I really believe that anyone is capable of making deeply moving art.

WHAT’S THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE CAREER SO FAR?
I just finished a solo show in Newcastle called “Do”.  I was expanding on the ideas I had seen in a TED talk around the practical definition of failure circus performers have.

IF YOU WEREN’T DOING CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING RIGHT NOW?
Dreaming of doing circus.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU LIKE PERFORMING AND WHY?
I love static trapeze, she is my love.  I love it because I still find new ways to move and explore on it.  There are endless possibilities.

WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE IN 5 YEARS TIME?
A headline swinging trapeze act in front of a huge crowd supported by my family and friends.

WHY DO WE NEED CIRCUS/PHYSICAL THEATRE IN THE WORLD?
To make the world happier.  This community builds a platform in which to support our friends, listen to their ideas and go to their events.

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